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Saturday, September 26, 2015

Austria 2015
Leather Pants with Swarovski Crystals - Leatherhosen









First stamp with Swarovski crystal was issued in 2014. The collaboration with the internationally famous company Swarovski, which has been producing top-quality crystals in the Tyrolean town of Wattens for over 120 years, is being continued in this present unconventional issue: a commemorative in the form of a pair of Alpine lederhosen made of Alcantara leather decorated with Swarovski crystals.


ALCANTARA is a tradename given to a composite material used to cover surfaces and forms in a variety of applications. It can be described as an artificial substitute for suede leather. The material was developed in the early 1970s by Miyoshi Okamoto, a scientist working for the Japanese chemical company Toray Industries.

Alcantara is composed of about 68% polyester and 32% polyurethane, giving increased durability and stain resistance. The appearance and tactile feel of the material is similar to that of suede, and it may be incorrectly identified as such.



Swarovski produces a wide range of products that stand out for their unique quality, craftsmanship and creativity. The company was founded in Austria in 1895, and develops, produces and markets both high quality crystals, synthetic jewellery stones and genuine gems, and jewellery, accessories and lighting solutions. The Crystals field of business, which is celebrating its 120th anniversary this year and is managed by the fifth family generation, is present with around 2,560 stores in roughly 170 countries. A staff of over 25,000 earned sales of around 2.33 billion Euro in 2014.

The Crystals field of business together with the affiliates Swarovski Optik (precision optical equipment) and Tyrolit (grinding tools) forms the Swarovski Group, which in 2014 employed a staff of over 30,000 and achieved sales of 3.05 billion Euro.
The Swarovski Foundation was set up in 2012 to promote creativity and culture and to work towards the wellbeing of mankind and the protection of natural resources – entirely in the philanthropic tradition of the company founder, Daniel Swarovski.
The combination of Swarovski crystals and a pair of lederhosen is actually obvious. Both are a kind of symbol of the Alpine world and are often associated with Austria. For instance, lederhosen are part of the basic wardrobe for many a Tyrolean. They are usually made out of deerskin, sewn by hand and short for daily wear or in the form of knickerbockers for special occasions. Braces serve to ensure that the trousers sit well and often have fine embroidery work on the cross-piece. The buttoned fly flap is also typical of traditional lederhosen as worn by Emperor Franz Joseph when out hunting over 100 years ago, and the trouser legs are often decorated with edelweiss or oak-leaf embroidery. Many traditional costume associations are today dedicated to the preservation of the traditional costumes in Austria’s provinces, while events such as the Munich Oktoberfest have helped to make the dirndl and the lederhosen modern once again, although in less traditional designs. Incidentally, the buttons on real lederhosen are usually made of buckhorn and not Swarovski crystals.

The high-quality leather stamp with sparkling Swarovski crystals thus combines two traditions characteristic of Austria in a completely new way to create a very special miniature work of art.